Bollywood Movie Reviews

Friday, Aug 06, 2021 | Last Update : 08:49 AM IST

  Reviews

Reviews

  • Review: Haseen Dillruba: Wild, wicked but with warts

    Review: Haseen Dillruba: Wild, wicked but with warts


    Kanika Dhillon's writing is as much the 'hero' of "Haseen Dillruba" as Taapsee Pannu, who breathes life into the titular protagonist with trademark relish, or Vikrant Massey -- just give the guy a meaty role and watch him go. That's not to say there are no rough edges in the script, you'll spot plenty of loopholes here.

  • Review: June: Hard as nails yet sensitive

    Review: June: Hard as nails yet sensitive


    Suhrud Godbole and Vaibhav Khisti's coming-of-age film is hard as nails while conveying its message, yet sensitive while driving home the point. The script focuses on issues such as bullying, teenage confusion, self-harm and suicide, and also touches upon wider issues as sexism and generation gap.

  • Review: Ray: Uneven but worth a binge

    Review: Ray: Uneven but worth a binge


    It's compulsively dark for most parts, often strangely so, the way Satyajit Ray's oeuvre rarely was. Ray had a way of serving the sombre in layers, with simplistic emotions often acting as mask for deeper subtexts.

  • Review: Luca: Talks of inclusion with cute relish

    Review: Luca: Talks of inclusion with cute relish


    "Luca" talks of inclusion, and the importance of accepting those that are perceived as different by society. Like all Pixar productions, the film serves its message in a goodlooking package that brims with feel-good verve, and animation that is as striking as you'd expect from the banner.

  • Review: Sherni: Slow-burn impact

    Review: Sherni: Slow-burn impact


    "Sherni" tackles several diverse issues. The film is as much about sexism in the 'sarkari' workplace offices as it is about rapid erosion of forest land and the threat to wildlife in the name of development.

  • Review: Shaadisthan: Shoddy storytelling

    Review: Shaadisthan: Shoddy storytelling


    Sometimes, the best intentions are lost in inadequate execution. "Shaadisthan" is a film that talks of women's empowerment, but the effort is burdened by shoddy storytelling that simply fails to hold your attention.

  • Review: Sunflower: Quirky but lacks focus

    Review: Sunflower: Quirky but lacks focus


    "Sunflower" keeps you guessing all the way, all right -- but that's because the show tries to do too many things, diluting the impact of the dark comedy thrills it should have stuck to. It's starts on a different sort of a high as a murder mystery, showing you the murder (and murderer) right at the start.

  • Review: Dom: Gripping saga

    Review: Dom: Gripping saga


    The father is a cop, the son is a criminal, and the show is a suspense drama woven around familial conflict. Bollywood masala, anyone? Well, "Dom" is based on a true story that happened in Brazil, the pre-credits announce. Truth can be stranger than fiction.

  • Review: The Family Man 2: Binge therapy

    Review: The Family Man 2: Binge therapy


    "The Family Man 2" crafts its fictional action drama referencing subcontinental socio-politics. Mainly centred on the Sri Lankan Tamil rebel movement, the plot incorporates an Indian Prime Minister concerned about China's need to gain strategic advantage in Indian Ocean and Pakistan's swing towards ultra-Right as necessary mentions.

  • Review: 'Friends: The Reunion': The one that flew down memory lane

    Review: 'Friends: The Reunion': The one that flew down memory lane


    "Friends: The Reunion" was never really meant to reload the hysteria. The purpose was always to remind the world that the hysteria still exists. Seventeen years after the original series ended its decade's run, the reunion special was essentially aimed at reiterating the fact that nostalgia around the series is still intact.

  • Review: The Climb: Winsome indie humour

    Review: The Climb: Winsome indie humour


    "The Climb" is a 'bromantic comedy' that hits the road running -- or cycling if you may, given the opening scene. Friends Mike (Michael Angelo Covino) and Kyle (Kyle Marvin) are struggling uphill on racer bikes. Huffing for breath, Kyle announces joyously that he is about to get married.

  • Review: Radhe: Salman Khan's chaos of set pieces

    Review: Radhe: Salman Khan's chaos of set pieces


    You couldn't care less, of course if you are a Salman fan, you weren't logging in for the sake of story. You're in it to watch all that goes on in between, when the 'story' isn't interfering with what Salman Khan needs to do on screen to reaffirm his Bollywood superstardom.